Floating and Creativity

Art Night at Waves.png

John Lennon, Michael Jackson, Robin Williams all floated. Susan Sarandon, Jeff Bridges, Kristen Wiig, Jim Carrey, and Michael Crichton all float for various reasons.  These are some of the most well known people in their creative careers.  Besides the most famous actors, authors, artists, and musicians, a large number of other creative people float to boost their creativity among other reasons.  We want to boost the creativity for the community, so for the next couple months, we are offering a night dedicated to creating and floating.  You don't have to float in order to come to Art Night @ Waves, but we would love to have some people float and then see how it affects their creativity.  The event is $20 for the art and supplies as well as a 15 minute session in our massage chair.  If you want to come in and float these days, the art and massage chair session during Art Night is free!

Here is some more info about floating and creativity:

Floating and Jazz Improvisation

Floating and music

 

Floating for Anxiety and Stress Relief

Since I was a child, I have been anxious.  As an adult, my worrying and anxiety only intensified and created more problems for me.  A few years ago I was reintroduced to yoga and the resting that comes at the end of it, savasana.  The first class I had attended ended with a good 5 minutes of silence and rest.  Five whole minutes where there were no kids asking me to do things for them, no dinner to be made or laundry to be done, no demands on me at all.  It was blissful!  All the next week I waited to get back to the that class.  That five minutes became the best part of my week.  Then one day, we didn't get that five minutes.  I was angry and disappointed.  The thing was that now that I knew how important that time was, the time for just me, it was not something I was going to let go of so easily, 

Not long after that, I decided meditation needed to become a priority.  My counselor had suggested it a couple months before, but I scoffed at the idea of taking time to "do nothing".  I had never been one to take time for myself, as it seemed counterproductive to do nothing when there was so much to do.   With stresses building in my life, something had to give.  At that point I started a small meditation practice.  Most days, after work, before getting the kids, I spent 10-15 minutes doing yoga by myself and then laying down on my mat and doing nothing.  Within a couple weeks I was amazed at how I could be worrying about something to the point of driving myself insane, then stop and not think about the problem, or much of anything, and get off my mat knowing how to solve the problem.  It would be like a lightbulb went off in my head.  So,  started making it a bigger priority.  Now I practiced every day and found I was less crabby with my kids and husband.  I had more patience at work and came up with new ideas and ways of approaching difficult tasks.  

After about a year, I was introduced to floating.  The first time I entered a tank, I thought about how there were no lights (we have lights at Waves) and there was no way to really explore where I would be laying, completely vulnerable, for the next hour.  I took a breath and shut the lid.  Upon leaving that tank, everything felt new and wonderful.  My body felt light and airy, my mind clear and calm.  My husband found floating greatly helped him and built a tank in our basement.  Read more of his experience here.  So my floating practice started. Once a month, I would go into this little room in our basement and leave feeling refreshed.  My meditation practice became a daily priority and for around 15 minutes now.  At this point I noticed that things people did that used to bother me and leave me frustrated or angry no longer bothered me as much.  With medical guidance and less anxiety, I managed to stop taking my anti-anxiety medication.  That was a huge step for me, as it was something I had never wanted to do, but had to do for my sanity.  After a few months, I started seeing my counselor less, and then not at all.  She was impressed with the change in me as well.  Also, my creativity was building as was my confidence in my personal decisions.  I felt was vastly different and more happy in my own skin.  I could do things I would once never have believed I could do, one of which was resigning from my job and deciding to start my own business.  It was just the path that needed to be taken at the time.  

Now my goal is to float weekly.  If I float less frequently, my anxiety starts to grow and I have less patience.  Now, I am not going to say I am patient and calm all of the time, since that is not something that most people can manage.  I can say, I am calmer, happier, and have the tools to go through life with more patience and calm. 

Ultimately, this was why we opened Waves, we wanted to help others that had similar issues like we did.  We know it can work, because it worked so well for us.  So we invite you to come in and get to know yourself a little better.  Meditation knowledge is not required to float.  We can help you with that if you want to go that direction.  All that is needed is an open mind and a little time.  We hope you leave feeling lighter and happier and more confident to face the world.  If you ever have any questions, just ask.  Our goal is to help you.  

-Kasandra

Fighting Anxiety and Stress in the Winter

 by Kasandra Gregoire  In the winter months, the land rests.  Leaves fall from the trees and then a snowy stillness falls and everything rests.  Well, everything except humans.  As the land and some animals head towards hibernation, we become busier than ever.  There is holiday after holiday where we meet with family and friends and try to please everyone around us, all while becoming more and more frantic.  Then all the holiday buzz is over and many make resolutions to lose extra weight or cut out unhealthy foods, but the buzz within continues.  The weather here in North Dakota aggravates it all.  We rush kids to hockey practice and gymnastics, we meet with various groups, rush off to classes, hastily make a family meal or rush to pick something up as we run about our daily lives.  It is really no wonder why so many people suffer from  Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) .  We rush about pleasing everyone and then rushing to lose those Christmas cookie pounds, but less frequently do we look within.  How can you fight anxiety and stress in the winter?    1.  Take time for you.  This is the biggest and sometimes the hardest thing to do when life is so busy.  I fought for a long time to carve some time for myself and that came after a much longer fight to deny I needed that time.  This can be done in a number of ways: make time daily to read a book, write in a journal, go for a walk, do yoga, float, dance, find a sport or activity that resonates with you, meditate, draw, create, or enjoy a meal alone.  The key point here is there are no demands on you.  2.  Don't rush unless you absolutely have to.  Get up or leave earlier.  Say no to unreasonable demands.  Don't get set in the ways it has "always been done".  Ask yourself if whatever you are rushing to is that important.  Are you going to a meeting where you know there will be visiting for the first few minutes anyway?  Take a breath and let yourself have that time.  Notice how often rushing around causes you frustration or anxiety. Besides stressing you out, it is also  unproductive .  3.  Move your body.  It has been said a million time, but it should be said again:   movement makes you feel happy.   Don't do it for weight loss or because you feel obligated, do it for the sheer fun of it.  Pick something you WANT to do.  A few years ago I decided to try running to lose weight, feel better, and have more energy.  However, I hate running.  It was something I forced myself to do and found as many ways to cut corners as possible.  What I love is dancing and yoga, so that is what I do.  Find what you love to do and do that.    4.  Eat well.  This one is again, not to look amazing on the beach, but because the body you have is the one that has to get you through life.  Healthy foods that nourish your body, will make you feel better physically and mentally. I am not saying you should rush out and join the newest fad diet or never eat a cupcake again.  You know that eating burgers all of the time will not make you feel great and that fresh produce will make you feel better.    5.  Do nothing.  Once you find a way to prioritize some time for you, get in the practice of doing nothing.  Everything needs to be reset from time to time.   Floating is an excellent way to do this .  In the tank there is just you, water, and epsom salt.  If you have never tried meditating, or couldn't relax while doing it, floating is the perfect way to get your mind to relax.  You don't have the pain you may get while sitting or lying down for extended periods of time, since your body is completely supported in the salt water solution.  One thing I learned soon after I started meditating was this: when I do nothing and shift my focus from problems, I will usually find a solution very soon.  The brain just needs a reboot.  6.  Do something with people who support you.  Getting out of the house and doing something fun with friends who support you can greatly alleviate stress.  It doesn't need to be an elaborate outing, but some time laughing with people who care about you.  Laughter relieves stress and finding people who can both support you and can relate to you will show help you feel less alone.  7.  Go outside.  Maybe not when it is 40 degrees below zero, but if you have proper winter apparel, getting outside in the sun (vitamin D is crazy important) and fresh air is uplifting.  It also gets you out of the house, which can lift your spirits by itself.    8.  If nothing is working and you are feeling depressed and have lost interest in what you used to love, go talk to a doctor.    *This is not medical advice and you should consult a doctor if your sadness is affecting your life. 

by Kasandra Gregoire

In the winter months, the land rests.  Leaves fall from the trees and then a snowy stillness falls and everything rests.  Well, everything except humans.  As the land and some animals head towards hibernation, we become busier than ever.  There is holiday after holiday where we meet with family and friends and try to please everyone around us, all while becoming more and more frantic.  Then all the holiday buzz is over and many make resolutions to lose extra weight or cut out unhealthy foods, but the buzz within continues.  The weather here in North Dakota aggravates it all.  We rush kids to hockey practice and gymnastics, we meet with various groups, rush off to classes, hastily make a family meal or rush to pick something up as we run about our daily lives.  It is really no wonder why so many people suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).  We rush about pleasing everyone and then rushing to lose those Christmas cookie pounds, but less frequently do we look within.

How can you fight anxiety and stress in the winter?  

1.  Take time for you.  This is the biggest and sometimes the hardest thing to do when life is so busy.  I fought for a long time to carve some time for myself and that came after a much longer fight to deny I needed that time.  This can be done in a number of ways: make time daily to read a book, write in a journal, go for a walk, do yoga, float, dance, find a sport or activity that resonates with you, meditate, draw, create, or enjoy a meal alone.  The key point here is there are no demands on you.

2.  Don't rush unless you absolutely have to.  Get up or leave earlier.  Say no to unreasonable demands.  Don't get set in the ways it has "always been done".  Ask yourself if whatever you are rushing to is that important.  Are you going to a meeting where you know there will be visiting for the first few minutes anyway?  Take a breath and let yourself have that time.  Notice how often rushing around causes you frustration or anxiety. Besides stressing you out, it is also unproductive.

3.  Move your body.  It has been said a million time, but it should be said again:  movement makes you feel happy.  Don't do it for weight loss or because you feel obligated, do it for the sheer fun of it.  Pick something you WANT to do.  A few years ago I decided to try running to lose weight, feel better, and have more energy.  However, I hate running.  It was something I forced myself to do and found as many ways to cut corners as possible.  What I love is dancing and yoga, so that is what I do.  Find what you love to do and do that.  

4.  Eat well.  This one is again, not to look amazing on the beach, but because the body you have is the one that has to get you through life.  Healthy foods that nourish your body, will make you feel better physically and mentally. I am not saying you should rush out and join the newest fad diet or never eat a cupcake again.  You know that eating burgers all of the time will not make you feel great and that fresh produce will make you feel better.  

5.  Do nothing.  Once you find a way to prioritize some time for you, get in the practice of doing nothing.  Everything needs to be reset from time to time.  Floating is an excellent way to do this.  In the tank there is just you, water, and epsom salt.  If you have never tried meditating, or couldn't relax while doing it, floating is the perfect way to get your mind to relax.  You don't have the pain you may get while sitting or lying down for extended periods of time, since your body is completely supported in the salt water solution.  One thing I learned soon after I started meditating was this: when I do nothing and shift my focus from problems, I will usually find a solution very soon.  The brain just needs a reboot.

6.  Do something with people who support you.  Getting out of the house and doing something fun with friends who support you can greatly alleviate stress.  It doesn't need to be an elaborate outing, but some time laughing with people who care about you.  Laughter relieves stress and finding people who can both support you and can relate to you will show help you feel less alone.

7.  Go outside.  Maybe not when it is 40 degrees below zero, but if you have proper winter apparel, getting outside in the sun (vitamin D is crazy important) and fresh air is uplifting.  It also gets you out of the house, which can lift your spirits by itself.  

8.  If nothing is working and you are feeling depressed and have lost interest in what you used to love, go talk to a doctor.  

*This is not medical advice and you should consult a doctor if your sadness is affecting your life. 

Why Are Athletes Using Float Therapy?

In the last few years, flotation therapy, sensory deprivation, isolation therapy, or Restricted Environmental Stimulus Technique (R.E.S.T.) Therapy have began popping up all over the country.  One of the most common questions we are asked, is "why do people float?"  There are many reasons: chronic and acute pain relief, anxiety, migraines, stress relief, relaxation, creativity, and sports recovery.  Today, I am going to talk about sports recovery.  

There is promising research going into floating for athletic recovery and here is a link to our scientific research page on the topic.  The testimonials on floating for athletic recovery from professional athletes has also been quite impressive the last few years.  A couple years ago, the Chicago Cubs, the New England Patriots, and the Golden State Warriors all won their championships and all had prominent players who float regularly.  Some like Steph Curry and Tom Brady are quite vocal about it as well.  Floating helps the mind focus, the body recover and rest, and stimulates relaxation.  Some other athletes who have talked about floating are Jonathan Toews, Carl Lewis, Wayne Rooney, and Aly Raisman.  Besides these individual athletes, the Dallas Cowboys, Seattle Seahawks, and Philadelphia Phillies float or have float tanks in their training facilities.  

See Steph Curry explain floating here.

 

 

Why I Float

Since I was a child, I have been anxious.  As an adult, my worrying and anxiety only intensified and created more problems for me.  A few years ago I was reintroduced to yoga and the resting that comes at the end of it, savasana.  The first class I had attended ended with a good 5 minutes of silence and rest.  Five whole minutes where there were no kids asking me to do things for them, no dinner to be made or laundry to be done, no demands on me at all.  It was blissful!  All the next week I waited to get back to the that class.  That five minutes became the best part of my week.  Then one day, we didn't get that five minutes.  I was angry and disappointed.  The thing was, now that I knew how important that time was, the time for just me, it was not something I was going to let go of so easily, 

Not long after that, I decided meditation needed to become a priority.  My counselor had suggested it a couple months before, but I scoffed at the idea of taking time to "do nothing".  I had never been one to take time for myself, as it seemed counterproductive to do nothing when there was so much to do.   With stresses building in my life, something had to give.  At that point I started a small meditation practice.  Most days after work, before getting the kids, I spent 10-15 minutes doing yoga by myself and then laying down on my mat and doing nothing.  Within a couple weeks I was amazed at how I could be worrying about something to the point of driving myself insane, then stop and not think about the problem, or much of anything, and get off my mat knowing how to solve the problem.  It would be like a lightbulb went off in my head.  So, I started making it a bigger priority.  Now I practiced every day and found I was less crabby with my kids and husband.  I had more patience at work and came up with new ideas and ways of approaching difficult tasks.  

After about a year, I was introduced to floating.  The first time I entered a tank, I thought about how there were no lights (we have lights at Waves) and there was no way to really explore where I would be laying, completely vulnerable, for the next hour.  I took a breath and shut the lid.  Upon leaving that tank, everything felt new and wonderful.  My body felt light and airy, my mind clear and calm.  My husband found floating greatly helped him and built a tank in our basement.  Read more of his experience here.  So my floating practice started. Once a month, I would go into this little room in our basement and leave feeling refreshed.  My meditation practice became a daily priority and for around 15 minutes now.  At this point I noticed that things people did that used to bother me and leave me frustrated or angry no longer bothered me as much.  With medical guidance and less anxiety, I managed to stop taking my anti-anxiety medication.  That was a huge step for me, as it was something I had never wanted to do, but had to do for my sanity.  After a few months, I started seeing my counselor less, and then not at all.  She was impressed with the change in me as well.  Also, my creativity was building as was my confidence in my personal decisions.  I felt was vastly different and more happy in my own skin.  I could do things I would once never have believed I could do, one of which was resigning from my job and deciding to start my own business.  It was just the path that needed to be taken at the time.  

Now my goal is to float weekly.  If I float less frequently, my anxiety starts to grow and I have less patience.  Now, I am not going to say I am patient and calm all of the time, since that is not something that most people can manage.  I can say, I am calmer, happier, and have the tools to go through life with more patience and calm. 

Ultimately, this was why we opened Waves, we wanted to help others that had similar issues like we did.  We know it can work, because it worked so well for us.  So we invite you to come in and get to know yourself a little better.  Meditation knowledge is not required to float.  We can help you with that if you want to go that direction.  All that is needed is an open mind and a little time.  We hope you leave feeling lighter and happier and more confident to face the world.  If you ever have any questions, just ask.  Our goal is to help you.  

-Kasandra

How we got into Floating

Floating for us started around 3 years ago.  In search for relief from chronic pain from Lymes Disease, I had started listening to health and wellness podcasts looking for some help.  I had tried several ways, including doctors, physical therapists, pain medication, and mental therapists with little relief. However, I was determined to find something that worked.  I went from being a marathoner and long distance cyclist to someone that could barely move almost overnight.

The health and wellness podcasts got me interested in trying floating.  They spoke of the relief from pain that the weightlessness provided, amongst the other benefits of anxiety and stress reduction.  On vacation in Chicago, we found a float center and decided to try it out.  It was that day I found relief.  The pain I had in my lower back stopped while floating and I left that float center feeling refreshed.  A couple weeks later I tried floating again in St. Paul and felt the muscles in my back finally relax after being tense for a very long time.  It was as if I had forgotten what relaxed was suppose to feel like.  When I felt those muscles let go and the felt relief, I knew then floating was going in my life.  A month later my Dad and I built a float tank in my basement, and have used it every week for over two years.  I find so many benefits from using it.  It is an excellent place to relax, think, meditate, and just breathe.  In August of 2016 we decided that we wanted to share floating with our community.  We have been working on getting a float center in the Red River Valley since then and we are so pleased that we are finally open and able to provide this service.